Teaching

Let the Church say “Amen”

What’s in a word?

Amen.

Amen is literally a universal word:

The word “amen” is a most remarkable word. It was transliterated directly from the Hebrew into the Greek of the New Testament, then into Latin and into English and many other languages, so that it is practically a universal word. It has been called the best-known word in human speech. The word is directly related–in fact, almost identical–to the Hebrew word for “believe” (aman), or “faithful.” Thus, it came to mean “sure” or truly,” an expression of absolute trust and confidence. When one believes God, he indicates his faith by an “amen.” When God makes a promise, the believer’s response is “amen”–”so it will be!” In the New Testament, it is often translated “verily” or “truly.” When we pray according to His Word and His will, we know God will answer, so we close with an “amen,” and so also do we conclude a great hymn or anthem of praise and faith.

The word is even a title of Christ Himself. The last of His letters to the seven churches begins with a remarkable salutation by the glorified Lord: “These things saith the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the creation of God” (Revelation 3:14).

We can be preeminently certain that His Word is always faithful and true, because He is none other than the Creator of all things, and thus He is our eternal “Amen.” As our text reminds us, every promise of God in Christ is “yea and amen,” as strong an affirmation of truth as can be expressed in the Greek language.

It is, therefore, profoundly meaningful that the entire Bible closes with an “amen.” “The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all. Amen” (Revelation 22:21), assuring everyone who reads these words that the whole Book is absolutely true and trustworthy. Amen! – HMM

Thayers Greek Lexicon says this about the word:

It was a custom, which passed over from the synagogues into the Christian assemblies, that when he who had read or discoursed had offered up a solemn prayer to God, the others in attendance responded Amen, and thus made the substance of what was uttered their own

The most common meaning to Amen is: so be it. This is defined as “Let it be so” or “I accept it as it is”. For example, If you can’t change the reservation, so be it; I’ll travel on Monday. This phrase, often given as translation of the Hebrew (and Greek and Latin) amen, has been employed in the current sense since about 1600.

I think the word is overused. Way overused and I’ll explain why.

Let the Church stop overusing the word “Amen”

Have you ever felt like a word gets overused so much so it loses it’s meaning? Words have a way of changing meaning based upon the intention of the person speaking it. It’s not that the word has actually changed but that the word loses it’s intensity. Kind of like listening to the same song over and over again…it’s loses it’s original effect. My previous post is in the similar vein to this. We says things without knowing what we are saying.

How many times have you been in Church and hear people say “Amen” after every sentence? Or people are preaching about the horrible things happening in the world and then hear people say “Amen”? Do we know what the word means? Are we saying “so be it” when things are being preached that are not biblical or when wrongs are spoken of? Are we saying “Amen” when the devil is having a hay day with someone? Are we standing in agreement with negativity unawares? Amen is a word of agreement more so than just a reply to a statement given.

Agreements are a powerful thing. We make them and break them all the time. What are you saying Amen to today?

Amen is meant to establish God’s kingdom on Earth with His Truth.

 

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My Favorite Books

book

Before I was following my Father, I hated reading. It was the ultimate kill joy of summer when I had a “summer reading list” as a child. I may have only read one or two books and did only one book report out of all of high school. Then, when I starting following my Father at the age of 20, I loved reading. I can’t get enough of it. I don’t have an exuberant amount of books…but I wish I did! It is probably because I am an introvert by nature and a Teacher Redemptive gift. I just felt like sharing the books I love and, if you haven’t read them, maybe you would get out of them as much as I did. This list is in no particular order and consist of both fiction and non-fiction.

The Bible by Holy Spirit and men moved by Him – Prefer NASB, AMP, and NKJV

The Shack by Wm. Paul Young

The Shack Revisited by C. Baxter Kruger

Wild at Heart by John Eldredge

Captivating by John and Stasi Eldredge

Love & War by John and Stasi Eldredge

Normal Christian Life by Watchman Nee

Mere Christianity by C. S. Lewis

Messy Spirituality by Michael Yaconelli

This Present Darkness and Piercing the Darkness by Frank Peretti

The Auschwitz Escape by Joel Rosenberg

Being With God series by Graham Cooke

Permission Granted by Graham Cooke

The Case for Faith by Lee Strobel

The Problem of Pain by C. S. Lewis

The Ragamuffin Gospel by Brennan Manning

The Pursuit of God by A. W. Tozer (had dream where I was in a huge library and climbed one of those old school library ladders and picked the book off the top shelf. So I bought it)

Boundaries by Henry Cloud and John Townsend

The God Chasers by Tommy Tenney

Victory Over the Darkness by Neil T. Anderson

What’s So Amazing About Grace by Philip Yancey

Visions From Heaven: Visitations to My Father’s Chamber by Wendy Alec

The Jesus I Never Knew by Philip Yancey

This Day I Was Crucified by Gene Edwards

Transported by the Lion of Judah by Anne Elmer

The Circle Series by Ted Dekker

Come Up Higher by Paul Cox

Exploring Heavenly Place Volumes I & II by Paul Cox

Defeating Dark Angels by Charles Kraft

A Celebration of Sex by Douglas E. Rosenau

Spiritual Revolution by Patricia King

For Men Only by Shaunti and Jeff Feldhahn

Developing Your Prophetic Gifting by Graham Cooke

Deadly Emotions by Dan Colbert M.D.

The Stronghold of God by Francis Frangipane

Agenda 21 by Glenn Beck

Beautiful Outlaw by John Eldredge

Fathered by God by John Eldredge

For Women Only by Shaunti Feldhahn

Elijah House Prayer Ministry materials

And now here are a few I look forward to reading in the future

Prophetic Wisdom by Graham Cooke

Dissociative Identity Disorder: Recognizing and Restoring the Severely Abused  Volume One by Tom Hawkins, Ph.D. with Diane W. Hawkins, M.A.

Multiple Identities: Understanding and Supporting the Severely Abused  by Diane W. Hawkins

The Weight of Glory by C. S. Lewis

These are among a few I still want to read along with many, not yet written books. If you know of other book, fiction and non-fiction that have touched your life please comment below and I may add them to my list.

Be blessed, Beloved